Request a Copy of Your Return

Revenue Online

Taxpayers may obtain copies online of their most recent income tax returns (paper or e-filed). Sign up for access to your tax account through Revenue Online. Revenue Online is a secure method of accessing tax account history and information.

Other Options:

If you are looking for an older return or you cannot access Revenue Online, download the Request for Copy of Tax Returns form (DR 5714). This form must be notarized before you mail it to the Department address noted in the instructions. This form may not be faxed. Please include the address where the documents should be mailed. Allow six to eight weeks to receive the certified copies.

Visit any Taxpayer Service Center location. The representatives can access copies of your returns at these locations. If you need a certified copy of a tax return, complete the DR 5714 when you are in the service center and submit it to the representative. Allow six to eight weeks to receive certified copies by mail.

Contact our Tax Information line: 303-238-7378. A copy of the return will be mailed to you. If you need a certified copy of a tax return, the representative will mail the DR 5714 request form to you. Complete the form, get it notarized and mail to the department address noted in the instructions. Allow six to eight weeks to receive certified copies by mail.

Reminder: A third party who has a valid state or federal Power of Attorney may request return copies by attaching the Colorado Tax Information Designation and Power of Attorney for Representation (DR 0145) or the federal 2848 power of attorney form to the DR 5714. The Power of Attorney document must specify the tax types the third party can access. Note that to ensure tax information confidentiality, the Request for Copy of Tax Returns requires notary verification on the paper form regarding the identity of the individual making the request, even when the taxpayer (not a third party) is making the request.

How long should I keep copies of my return?

Keep all papers and documentation you used in preparing your return until the statute of limitations runs out. This is usually four years from the date the return is due or filed. Many taxpayers maintain their records much longer than four years. There are various reasons why the statute of limitations may remain open much longer than four years. If the federal IRS audits your return after the four-year time frame or if the Department of Revenue discovers that your return was not received, you may need to provide copies of your return and back-up documentation after the four-year timeframe. Additionally, the information on certain tax matters may be needed long after the statute of limitations expire.