Infrastructure Failure

infrastructure
 

Gas

Pure natural gas is colorless and odorless. Scents are usually added to assist in identifying leaks. This odor commonly takes the form of a rotting egg aroma. Persons detecting the odor should immediately evacuate the area. Do not start a fire or use sparking electrical equipment. As a result of the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002 passed in the United States, Federal safety standards require companies providing natural gas to conduct safety inspections for gas leaks in homes and other buildings receiving natural gas. The gas company is required to inspect gas meters and inside gas piping from the point of entry into the building to the outlet side of the gas meter for gas leaks.

Power

The loss of electrical power for a long enough time would be expected to cause a certain proportion of affected persons to undergo serious hardships ─ particularly those who have special medical needs or disabilities. Shortages of certain types of goods or services may affect Colorado, even if the blackout itself is not directly experienced here. Similarly, gaps in communication, information, or service networks may have an effect well beyond the actual area that lacks electrical power.

Water

Water is an essential part of every community.  It is a necessary component of producing sectors, a key ingredient to sustaining life for its population, and is indispensable to fire protection and other specialized uses. The reality is that Colorado is far from 100% self-sufficient in its fresh water supplies. Moreover, waterways that import water into the region are vulnerable to natural disasters, terrorist attacks, technological accidents, and regulatory changes.  A major disruption of these external water supplies could potentially have devastating effects on the economy and the quality of life of its people.

 

Banner photo courtesy of FEMA/Wendell Davis.