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A Comprehensive Report on School Safety Technology

  • Report of John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The Report examines school safety technologies, how they are used, how those technologies were chosen, and how well they are working.

Beyond Gun Violence Prevention: Student Safety in Today's Schools 

  • Published by the University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education, 2018. 
  • One page, quick reference guide to balancing physical security with psychological and emotional security. 
  • Additional information, toolkits for teachers and other resources are also available on the Rossier School website.

Campus Security Guidelines: Recommended Operational Policies for Local and Campus Law Enforcement Agencies

  • Published September 2009 by the Major Cities Chiefs (MCC) Police Association and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)
  • MCC and BJA developed the Campus Security Guidelines in order to make a genuine difference in how law enforcement prevents, prepares, responds to and recovers from critical incidents on campus. The Guidelines are real operational policies, developed by the experts—local and campus law enforcement—that can be implemented across the nation.

Creating School Active Shooter/Intruder Drills

  • Provides information to schools about how to create a trauma-informed active shooter/intruder drill. This fact sheet outlines the steps to take before, during, and after for students, school staff, and parents. Published in 2018 by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent Extremism in the United States

  • Published by the White House in August 2011
  • This strategy commits the Federal Government to improving support to communities, including sharing more information about the threat of radicalization; strengthening cooperation with local law enforcement; and helping communities to better understand and protect themselves against violent extremist propaganda, especially online.

Lessons Learned Information Sharing (LLIS.gov)

  • Lessons Learned Information Sharing (LLIS.gov) is a Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency program. LLIS.gov serves as the national, online network of lessons learned, best practices, and innovative ideas for the emergency management and homeland security communities. This information and collaboration resource helps emergency response providers and homeland security officials prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other emergencies.
  • LLIS.gov provides federal, state, local, tribal and territorial responders and emergency managers with a wealth of information and front-line expertise on effective planning, training, and operational practices across homeland security functional areas. LLIS.gov includes a library of exclusive documents and user-submitted materials related to all aspects of homeland security and emergency management.
  • Active Shooter

National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)

  • As a program of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the NLECTC System is the conduit between researchers and criminal justice professionals in the field for technology issues. NLECTC works with criminal justice professionals to identify urgent and emerging technology needs. NIJ sponsors research and development or identifies best practices to address those needs. NLECTC centers demonstrate new technologies, test commercially available technologies and publish results — linking research and practice.
  • School Safety Resources
  • Sharing Ideas & Resources to Keep Our Nation's Schools Safe!
    • This report examines new products and apps to gauge and prevent potential school crises. The report also identifies new uses for familiar, standard-bearing technologies in school settings and highlights successful safety programs in urban and rural schools nationwide.
    • Published in 2013

Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Technical Assistance (TA) Center

School Transportation Security Awareness (STSA)

  • Launched in August 2013 by the Highway Motor Carrier Branch (HMC) of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
  • The School Transportation Security Awareness program was developed by HMC in conjunction with the National Association of State Directors of Pupil Transportation Services, the National Association of Pupil Transportation and the National School Transportation Association to provide much needed security awareness information and training to the school transportation industry. STSA focuses on terrorist and criminal threats to school buses, bus passengers and destination facilities. It is designed to provide school bus drivers, administrators, and staff members with information that will enable them to effectively identify and report perceived security threats, as well as the skills to appropriately react and respond to a security incident should it occur.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

  • Colorado Information Resources Guide 2015
    • This document provides a compilation of preparedness resources available in Colorado.
  • Homeland Security Grant Program Supplemental Resource: Children in Disasters Guidance
    • Created for FY 2012 Homeland Security grant recipients, this supplement provides guidance for grantees to incorporate children into their planning and purchase of equipment and supplies; provide training to a broad range of child-specific providers, agencies, and entities; and exercise capabilities relating to children, such as evacuation, sheltering and emergency medical care.
  •  K-12 School Security Practices Guide
    • Published in April, 2013, this guide provides security practices for consideration by communities to deter threats, address hazards and risks, as well as minimize damage from school incidents, including mass casualty events. The security practices include a spectrum of options for consideration, from programmatic and procedural considerations to technological enhancements that school administrators may consider implementing based upon the most likely threats to their school district and their available resources. The security practices guide includes options for consideration in developing a security plan that builds from existing comprehensive assessment efforts (e.g., culture and climate, school threat assessment) and blends a number of security practices to achieve an effect where threats are either deterred or delayed and detected in advance of creating harm.
  • K-12 School Security Checklist
    • Published in April, 2013, this checklist is a companion to the K-12 School Security Practices Guide to help schools assess their current security practices and enable improvement.

U.S. Fire Administration (USFA)

  • As an entity of the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the mission of the USFA is to provide national leadership to foster a solid foundation for our fire and emergency services stakeholders in prevention, preparedness, and response.
  • Fire / Emergency Medical Services Department Operational Considerations and Guide for Active Shooter and Mass Casualty Incidents
    • Published September 2013.
    • Local jurisdictions must build sufficient public safety resources to handle active shooter and mass casualty incident scenarios. Local fire, emergency medical services, and law enforcement must have common tactics, communications capabilities and terminology to have seamless, effective operations. They should also establish standard operating procedures for these very volatile and dangerous situations. The goal is to plan, prepare and respond in a manner that will save the maximum number of lives possible.

 

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