Possible water contamination at Water World June 11-13

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Updated 06/15/18
 
I visited Water World on June 11, 12, or 13, and I’m sick. What should I do?
  • People who became  sick after visiting Water World on June 11, 12, or 13 can call the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment at 303-692-2700. Staff at CDPHE will ask you some questions about your illness. If your symptoms are not getting better, you should call your health care provider. If you are no longer sick, you do not need to contact your health care provider.
  • If you are sick with diarrhea or vomiting, please:
    • Practice good handwashing using soap and hot water and rubbing hands together for at least 20 seconds.
    • Do not prepare food for others until your symptoms have been gone for at least 24 hours.
    • Stay home from work, school, child care and summer camp until your symptoms have been gone for at least 24 hours.
    • Do not work as a health care provider, child care provider, or food handler until your symptoms have been gone for at least 24 hours.
    • Do not swim while ill with diarrhea. Avoid swimming for two weeks after your diarrhea is over.
I visited Water World on June 11, 12 or 13, but I’m not sick. What should I do?
  • People who are not sick should monitor themselves for symptoms over the next couple of weeks. At this time, there is no need to call public health or your health care provider if you are not sick.  You can call CO-Help at 303-389-1687 or 1-877-462-2911 if you have questions about this event.
I visited Water World on a day other than June 11, 12, or 13 and became ill. What should I do?
  • If you visited Water World on a day before June 11 and became ill, your illness is not related to this event. If you are sick, and your symptoms are not getting better, call your health care provider. You do not need to call the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.
I work at Water World, and I’m sick. What should I do?
  • Work with the management at Water World to report your illness. Management is working with Tri-County Health Department to monitor for illness in employees.
What happened at Water World?
  • A power outage and subsequent repair of an improperly installed backflow prevention assembly likely allowed water from an irrigation pond to flow into the Water World potable (drinkable) water supply.
  • Untreated water might have contaminated swimming pools, water features, and drinking fountains, and may have been used to make ice, drinks, and food at all concession stands.
  • Only people who visited Water World on Monday, June 11, Tuesday, June 12, or Wednesday, June 13 could be affected by this event.
What is public health doing about the situation that happened at Water World?
  • The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is working with Tri-County Health Department to investigate this situation and determine if people were exposed to germs that could make them sick.
  • Public health investigating a number of reports of gastrointestinal illness among Water World patrons; however, as of June 15, public health is not aware of any diagnosed illnesses or what germ might be causing  the illnesses we are investigating.
  • Tri-County Health Department is working with Water World to determine if any employees are ill.
Is it safe to go to Water World now?
  • The problem has been corrected. Water World was closed on Thursday, June 14 for additional cleaning and disinfecting, but now is open.
What types of germs could be spread through contaminated water?
  • A variety of germs can be spread by swallowing contaminated water. Viruses (such as norovirus), bacteria (such as Salmonella and E. coli), and parasites (such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia) are some examples. Some of the germs cause illness within a day, and others can take several days or weeks to cause illness. These germs tend to cause gastrointestinal symptoms, like diarrhea or vomiting. Less commonly, contaminated water may contain germs that could cause skin infections or respiratory infections.
Health care providers