Rocky Mountain Biomonitoring Consortium projects

  • Arsenic in Drinking Water and Correlation With Type II Diabetes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado (ongoing):
    • To examine both Type 2 diabetes and Chronic Health Disease, the approach to exposure classification involved determining lifetime residence history and obtaining and analyzing water samples from current residences of study subjects.
    • Data for measured concentrations of arsenic in well water samples and data for arsenic concentrations in community drinking water systems will be used to estimate water concentrations for previous residences and for workplaces.
    • Study subjects had originally provided historic urine for another study, which has been archived and will be analyzed.
    • There are approximately 600 test subjects.
  • Drinking Water Exposure in the Rocky Mountain States (completed):
    • This project determined that a difference in urine arsenic levels and arsenic speciation ratios of total to non-dietary can be detected in individuals exposed to various concentrations of arsenic in drinking water.
    • Concentrations of heavy metals were also measured in samples collected for this study to establish baseline concentrations for these elements:
      • Antimony.
      • Arsenic.
      • Beryllium.
      • Cadmium.
      • Lead.
      • Manganese.
      • Mercury.
      • Molybdenum.
      • Platinum.
      • Selenium.
      • Tungsten.
      • Uranium.
    • During this project, 2000 samples were collected and analyzed for total metals and arsenic. Arsenic speciation methods were developed and conducted in Colorado and Arizona on samples that contained greater than 50 ug/L total arsenic in urine.
  • Feasibility of Using Newborn Bloodspot to Measure Metals (completed):
    • Blank punches along with blood dots were analyzed in pairs for lead, mercury and cadmium from each card submitted by Wyoming, New Mexico and Utah. 300 cards were analyzed.
  • Feasibility of Using Excess Urine From Health Clinics for Baseline Analysis (completed):
    • The study involved collection of 125 urine samples in five Wyoming clinics by the local public health response coordinators coordinated by the health department CT lab coordinator and shipment for analysis to the NMSLD.
    • Thiodiglycol (TDG) was the study analyte and is a metabolite of mustard gas and also a chemical with commercial uses and a potential environmental contaminant.