Who should be tested for lead?

 
If your child is under the age of six, you should talk to your doctor about testing your child for lead if you answer "yes" to any of the following questions:
  1. Is the child eligible for Medicaid, Child Health Plan Plus, or Colorado Indigent Care Program?
  2. Does the child reside in or regularly visit pre‐1978 homes in poor condition or recently renovated?
  3. Does the child reside in or regularly visit pre-1960 homes regardless of condition?
  4. Is the child a recent immigrant, refugee, or foreign adoptee?
  5. Does the child have a sibling or playmate who has or recently had a confirmed elevated blood lead level?
  6. Does the child have a household member who uses traditional, folk, or ethnic remedies or cosmetics, or who routinely eats food imported informally (e.g. by a family member) from abroad?
  7. Does the child have a household member who participates in a lead-related occupation or hobby?
  8. Do you or the parent suspect the child is at risk for lead exposure or does the child exhibit symptoms of lead poisoning (e.g. pica behavior, developmental delay, known exposure)?
Your child will have a blood test to find out if they have high levels of lead in their blood. The only way to know if a child has lead poisoning is to have the child tested for lead, because often no signs or symptoms are visible. Some low-cost health clinics also provide lead testing.
Information for Providers
Colorado recommends targeted screening for blood lead testing. Colorado guidelines currently recommend that all low-income children in Colorado should be tested for lead at 12 months and 24 months of age, using either a capillary or venous blood specimen. Further risk-based factors are mentioned in our lead screening guidelines.
 
Lead screening recommendation resources (NEW! Updated Jan. 2019):
    •  Lead screening recommendations and questionairre  
    •  Pocket Guide
    •  Customizable intake form

Guidelines for childhood blood lead case management are provided by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Blood lead levels have been a reportable condition in Colorado since 1997. Under the state’s reporting law, all laboratories performing blood lead tes5ts are required to report the results of those tests directly to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.