Clean Diesel School Bus Retrofit Program

 
Provided at no cost to school districts
 
Goal
  • To reduce exposure to diesel exhaust by retrofitting school buses with proven emissions-reduction technologies, including diesel-oxidation catalysts, engine preheaters and closed-crankcase filtration systems. 
 
How to enroll
 
1.  Document the following information:
  • School district name and number.
  • County.
  • Superintendent name.
  • Transportation/fleet manager name.
  • Street address (administration).
  • City or town, ZIP code.
  • Street address of bus depot.
OR
 
Fill out the Excel spreadsheet:
 
2.  Email the information or the document to:
 
 
Diesel emissions and health
  • Diesel exhaust contributes to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, including lung cancer.
  • Toxic emissions from diesel school bus tailpipes and crankcases pollute bus interiors, as well as outdoor air.
  • Bus riders and drivers may be exposed to these pollutants for extended periods.
  • Children, with their developing lungs and higher respiratory rates, are especially vulnerable. 
 
About the program
  • APCD diesel engine experts work with selected contractors to retrofit school buses with emission-reduction technologies.
  • These technologies are designed to reduce emissions and engine idling and can result in significant emissions reductions and cost savings.
    • Ex: Engine preheaters greatly reduce engine idling, which also saves fuel.
  • Once installed, APCD experts provide follow-up service to school districts to ensure emissions-reduction equipment is working properly.
  • APCD also provides idling reduction information and tools to fleet management staff, as well as to students and parent-teacher organizations, if desired.
 
We provide retrofit services to school districts depending on:
  • Funding availability.
  • Local air quality issues.
  • Vehicle age and configuration.
  • The Air Pollution Control Division's resources.
 
Completed retrofits
Completed retrofits map
 
Program funding
Program funding comes mainly from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency via Congress’ Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA).