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Retail Food Operator FAQ

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By contacting the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment at 303-692-3620 or the local health department of responsibility in the county in which you would like to operate.

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A Colorado Retail Food License must be obtained.

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If you are going to operate a retail food establishment ouside of the City and County of Denver, a Colorado Retail Food License can be issued by the county health department in which you intend to operate.

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Yes.  Submit the required plans to the local health department of jurisdiction.

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You must obtain a Colorado Retail Food License and comply with Chapter Nine of the Colorado Retail Food Establishment Rules and Regulations.

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No, if the pastries are not potentially hazardous.

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A bed and breakfast establishment is defined as: A residential structure(s)/property(s) providing sleeping accommodations; meals are provided and service to guests in one common eating area and/or the guest room, a single rate shall include room and board; and there shall be an innkeeper in residence within or adjacent to the bed and breakfast establishment.

 

If the establishment meets this definition, no retail food license is required. The establishment must comply only with the "Sanitary Standards and Regulations for Public Accommodations." If the establishment extends the food service operations, a retail food license is required in addition to meeting the regulations for public accommodations.

 

Information on how to obtain a retail food license and a copy of the regulations for public accommodations can be obtained from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment at 303-692-3620 or local health department of jurisdiction.

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Hamburgers should be cooked to an internal temperature of 155o F or until the juices run clear.  Customers do have the option to order hamburger or steak cooked to their preference.

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No.  However, when installed, the grease trap shall be located away from food preparation areas, be easily accessible for cleaning and it must be installed flush to the floor.

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It is not required by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. The U.S. Department of Justice is responsible for developing and enforcing ADA public accommodations as well as state and local government regulations. Contact the Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center for technical assistance at 800-949-4232.

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A uniform temperature of 140o F or above, except for the following:

  • Poultry, poultry stuffing, stuffed meats and stuffing containing meats should be cooked at a minimum of 165o F
  • Pork and foods containing pork and ground beef should be cooked at a minimum of 155o F
  • Rare roast beef and rare beefsteak should be cooked at a minimum of 130o F
  • Leftovers should be cooked at a minimum of 165o F
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No, unless you have a separate kitchen in your home that is dedicated to production of the food. The kitchen must be approved by the local health department or the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Non-profit, charitable organizations may be exempt. Contact the department at 303-692-3620 or the local health department in the county in which the organization is located.

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Food service workers are required to wear gloves or similar protective barriers when handling ready-to-eat food or foods that will not be further washed or cooked, unless the establishment operates using a “bare hand contact plan” that has been approved by their local public health agency. Gloves, utensils, and deli papers are some examples of items that can be used to prevent bare hand contact.

  


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