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Protect Yourself

If you have any questions or concerns related to Fraud and your Birth Certificate, feel free to e-mail our Fraud Prevention Staff at: cdphe_osrvs.fraud@state.co.us.


 

To prevent becoming a victim of this type of crime, there are some steps you can take with your vital records and those of your family:

 

 

  • Only handle certificates WHEN NECESSARY. Return to storage ASAP!!!
  • NEVER routinely carry birth certificates (or Social Security Cards) in wallet, purse, etc.
  • Obtain and use a Safety Deposit Box, Home Safe or Lockbox
  • NEVER disclose personal information to anyone you don’t know.
     

  • Government agencies – May need to view, and briefly retain original document for processing

 

  • Public/Private School – May need to view original and may wish to retain a PHOTOCOPY of certificate in the child’s student record. NEVER provide an original certificate! As the Mother’s Maiden Name is a common security question used by banks and credit institutions, we HIGHLY RECOMMEND that you black out the Mother’s Maiden Name on the photocopy of any certificate you provide.

 

  • Youth Sports Officials – May need to view or retain a PHOTOCOPY of certificate to prove child’s eligibility. NEVER provide an original certificate! Once again, as the Mother’s Maiden Name is a common security question used by banks and credit institutions, we HIGHLY RECOMMEND that you black out the Mother’s Maiden Name on the photocopy of any certificate you provide.

File copies of a person's death certificate with the three major credit-reporting agencies (stealing a dead person's identity is fairly easy). If this is done, when a credit-card company receives an application for a card and checks with one of the reporting agencies on the applicant's credit history, the company will find that the holder of the Social Security number involved is actually deceased. For more detailed information on protecting a dead person's identity, The Identity Resource Center is a good place to start.
 

Be cautious about with whom you share your birth certificate and your child(ren)'s birth certificate. Secure these documents in your home, especially if you have roommates, employ outside help or are having work done in your home.

 

You may obtain a death certificate application form directly from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

 


Additional Resources: