Home Food Service Plan Purchasing FAQ

A.

The Colorado Department of Agriculture requires door-to-door meat sellers to be licensed and bonded. Sellers are required to provide a written receipt describing the products they are selling. The receipt should be dated, list the name and address of the seller, disclose in detail what was purchased, and be signed by the purchaser. This disclosure helps potential buyers make an informed decision. The sale of meat act also requires that the consumer has a "cooling off" period after a purchase.

A.

Companies that sell meat and poultry door-to-door in Colorado must apply for a license, and submit copies of their advertising brochures and sales receipts to the HFSP Program Administrator for approval. The sales brochures cannot be misleading with regard to the advertised products. The HFSP Program's inspectors visit licensed companies and verify that the consumers are given the proper disclosures at the time of the sale.

A.

You should consider the following suggestions:

 

  • Find out the price per pound. The salesman may tell you it is the price per portion that is important. However, price per pound is the only way to compare the price of meat.
  • Read the label on the product package before you buy. If the seller claims the products are all natural, organic, or contain no antibiotics or growth hormones, it must be stated on the label. Some companies offer meat or poultry that has been tenderized with a marinade or flavoring agent. The weight of these products may consist of up to 20% of marinade or tenderizer.
  • Check to see if the product is graded. Grade is the quality indicator for beef and poultry. The highest quality grade for beef is "Prime" which is followed by "Choice" and "Select" grades. Pork is not graded. The top poultry grade is A. If beef is not graded, it is probably a lower quality than you would purchase at a grocer or meat market.

 

A.

Sometimes, consumers may have second thoughts about whether they made a wise purchase, especially if the quality of the meat or poultry is not what they expected. Colorado's Sale Of Meat Act requires the seller to give the consumer three days to cancel a purchase that was made in the home. Under the law, the salesperson must orally inform the purchaser of their cancellation rights at the time of sale. Two copies of a cancellation form and a copy of the receipt must also be provided.