FAQs

A.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Water Quality Control Division is responsible for issues pertaining to surface water.

A.

The Colorado Division of Water Resources (also known as the Office of the State Engineer) administers water rights, deals with issues of water quantity, and issues well permits.

A.

First, you should read the pesticide label for disposal instructions. If no specific instructions are given, please refer to the Pesticide Waste Disposal map on this website for more information.

A.

The herbicide Atrazine and its breakdown products.

A.

Multiple factors are considered when determining which pesticides are selected for analysis:

  1. Chemical/physical properties of the pesticide
  2. Frequency of use
  3. Frequency of detection in groundwater samples
  4. EPA suggested groundwater analytes
A.

Not all pesticides pose an environmental risk of impacting groundwater quality and/or human health.

A.

We concentrate our efforts in areas meeting the following criteria: shallow, unconfined aquifers with water lying within 100 feet of the surface; coarse textured soils presenting high potential for contaminant leaching to the groundwater; association with non-point source pollution like irrigated agriculture and multiple-land-use areas found in urban environments; and groundwater importance for human or animal consumption.

A.

We publish all of our results annually in a written report and on our publicly available, online database. We also analyze and use the data to determine trends in pesticide and nitrate/nitrite contamination, confirm the need to increase/decrease sample density in specific well networks, and determine correlation to land use practices for the creation of best management practices (BMPs).

A.

No! The data associated with a specific well is relevant only to that well and keep in mind that our program only analyzes samples for agricultural chemicals and there are many other chemicals that may affect groundwater quality.