Colorado Economic Recovery and Accountability

Alison Barber

Alison Barber





"I definitely owe my job to the Recovery Act."

Alison Barber, 23, of Denver, worried that she wouldn't find a job as she neared graduation at Colorado State University. The young woman studied construction management at CSU and saw job placement rates among new graduates drop because of the recession.


"It used to be like a 95-99 percent employment rate," Barber said. "Everybody used to get a job. Now it's less than 50 percent."


In the spring, Barber interviewed with a number of construction companies. And a company called Castle Rock Construction showed interest in her.


Barber credits the Recovery Act for providing opportunities and creating an environment that led to her finding work.


Without the Recovery Act, "at this point, Castle Rock Construction would probably be trying to lay off people," she said. Instead, they've won $39 million in contracts through Recovery Act-funded projects. That includes a piece of the $32 million project that includes improvements to a bike path on C-470 in Morrison.


Barber was hired as foreman and started work in June.


"I definitely owe my job to the Recovery Act."


"I really feel like the Recovery Act will trickle down slowly to everyone. I'm a more direct result."

 

 

>>> Click here to view more stories about how Recovery dollars are being put to work