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CO Department of
Public Safety

700 Kipling Street #1000
Denver CO 80215 USA
Tel: 303.239.4400
Fax: 303.239.4670

Structure

The Commission comprises 26 members and one ex-officio member as originated by HB 07-1358 and found in C.R.S., 16-11-102. The Commission assembles individuals into subgroups to identify and prioritize problems, issues, and opportunities and to offer solutions by way of recommendations to improve the criminal justice system.  The current structure of the Commission is pictured above and specific information on each of the current and previous subgroups may be found at Committees.

The labels assigned to CCJJ subgroups are specific and imply the hierarchical arrangement and process by which each functions and interacts with the Commission. The labels within the hierarchy include: subcommittee, task force, working group, and study group.

Subcommittee. A subcommittee is seated by the Commission to address a specific issue or serve a specific, time-limited function for the Commission. A subcommittee reports directly to the Commission and may be led by a chair and vice chair or by co-chairs. The chair of a subcommittee is a current member of the Commission. Subcommittees typically include 10 or fewer members and, given their normally narrow directive, do not usually break into smaller groups.  Subcommittee members are appointed by the Chair and Vice-Chair of the Commission. Upon approval by its members, subcommittees may forward recommendations or position statements to the Commission for consideration.

Task Force. A task force is seated by the Commission to address a topic area and to produce recommendations for Commission consideration. A task force reports directly to the Commission and may be led by a chair and vice chair or by co-chairs. The chair of a task force is a current member of the Commission. The members of a task force are appointed by the Chair and Vice Chair of the Commission. Additional members may be added by the task force chair upon approval by the Commission Chair. Upon approval by its members, task forces may forward recommendations to the Commission for consideration. Task forces typically include 25 or fewer members and may break into smaller groups labeled working groups.

Working Group. A working group is seated by a task force to address a specific topic area and to produce recommendations for the originating task force. A working group reports directly to the task force that created it.  Working groups may designate a leader to coordinate activities or speak for the group at task force or Commission meetings. The working group leader may or may not be a current member of the Commission, but is a member of the originating task force. Working groups report to the Task Force and do no present recommendations directly to the Commission until their work is approved by the originating task force. Working Groups include as many members and resource persons as is necessary to complete the work. A working group may break into smaller groups labeled study groups.

Study Group. A study group is seated by a working group to research a very specific topic area and to produce drafts of recommendations for the originating working group. Study groups do not forward recommendations directly to the Commission for consideration.   Study groups may designate a leader to coordinate activities or speak for the group at meetings higher in the structure. The study group leader may or may not be a member of the Commission, but is typically a member of the originating working group. Study groups include as many members and resource persons as is necessary to complete the work.  A study group does not break into smaller groups.