Text Size
Increase text size
Increase text size
Banner

Wholesale Food Frequently Asked Questions

A

Consumers can find information about food products mentioned in news stories at a number of locations. Recall information, which is most often referred to by the media, can be researched from several sources. The most inclusive of these is the federal government’s recall website, which can be found at www.recalls.gov. This site lists recalled products of all sorts, and includes a specific tab for information about food product recalls.

A

The procedure that should be followed if a food product is suspected of being adulterated (i.e., contaminated) is to:

  1. Contact the manufacturer or return the product to the purchase location if no illness or injury has occurred; then
  2. Promptly report the incident to your local health department or to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability at 303-692-3620.

 

A

Consumers can obtain interpretations of product codes only from a product’s manufacturer. Currently, there are no standardized or uniform requirements in Colorado for manufacturers to use when coding most products. Therefore, product codes are generally developed independently by each manufacturer to meet the individual company’s needs. The exceptions to this are baby formula, bottled water and low-acid canned foods, which, under the law, must have lot codes. However, lot coding on all other food products is completely voluntary and is developed at the manufacturer’s discretion.

A

Consumers can obtain a summary of basic labeling requirements on the Division of Environmental Health & Sustainability website at  Product Labeling Guidelines. More complete label information is contained on the federal Food & Drug Administration’s website. Consumers may also contact the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability at 303-692-3620 for further information.

 

A

There are specific certification and/or training requirements that must be completed before consumers can manufacture an acidified food or process seafood products. People interested in doing either of these should first contact the Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability at 303-692-3620 for further information.

A

Yes, food can be prepared in the home and then sold wholesale to retail markets, etc. if there is a separate kitchen or production facility in the home that is specifically dedicated for that purpose. The facility must encompass all aspects of production, including, but not limited to, dishwashing, finished product and ingredient storage, hand sinks and refrigeration. The separate facility must fulfill the Colorado Wholesale Food Regulations requirements, and be in compliance with the Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Packing or Holding Human Food. In addition, the kitchen facility may also require approval by the local health department of jurisdiction to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability.

A

Consumers can begin their own food processing business by registering with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability. This registration requirement was mandated by a state statute change that became effective July 1, 2003, and applies to every storage facility and wholesale food manufacturer in Colorado

 

In addition to the registration requirement, there also may be either a license or permit that must be purchased from the consumer’s local health department. It is advised that those consumers interested in beginning their own wholesale food business contact the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability, as well as their local health department, for details regarding registration, license and permit requirements.

 

A

Bottled water must satisfy all of the bacterial, chemical, physical and radiological standards listed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 21, Part 165. Additionally, the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 21, Part 129, the Colorado Pure Food and Drug Law, and the Sanitary Regulations outline the conditions under which any water should be bottled. The Federal Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA) and the Nutritional Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) also regulate the labeling of bottled water.

 

The hauling of water to a facility separate from its source by any firm is also regulated. These firms must follow the guidelines for hauling water set forth by the Water Quality Control Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

  


 Please contact us if you have any further questions